Low Fire Results

The low fire (cone 04) I ran last week went very well. Compared to the last time I tried to fire some planters this firing was 1000x better! I actually threw these planters and vases a few months ago, so it feels nice to finally finish them. I’m very happy with the planters and can’t wait to make more. Here is a link to my store if you’re interested in purchasing something 😉

This planter was a lot of work. I can hardly believe it didn’t fall apart on me some time during the process. I’m over the moon with how it turned out, my favorite from this firing by far!

I have to give a shout out to my wonderful husband. He helped we with the hemp rope knotting and macrame on the hanging planters. He’s pretty great with knots, and a creative himself. <3

I’m also in love with this vase. I worked a lot on the texture and the glaze flows in such an eye catching way <3

I see myself exploring more low fire work in the future. The results I achieved from these glazes are promising 🙂

If you’re looking for holiday gifts for your loved ones I still have a lot of new pieces for sale. I’m continuing my 30% off sale on my older work until after the new year also. This lovely is only $21.00 + s&h.

Happy Holidays to all those out there celebrating. Thanks for all the love and support <3

The Process

This isn’t easy for me. I happen to be a quite a perfectionist. I enjoy sharing my triumphs and my steps towards my goals. I don’t feel comfortable sharing the set backs and bumps along the way. I have come to realize that it’s healthy for me to share the good and the bad though, because it’s all part of the process.

Yesterday I put a lot of my work and effort into a glaze firing. For me this is a big deal. I haven’t been in a position where I’ve been able to fire my kiln, especially glaze fire (cone 5/6), until quite recently. This is the first time we’ve fired it for a glaze firing since moving it to our garage too. I have a good amount of time and experience in the throwing and creating part of ceramics, but I have a bit less experience when it comes to glazing and firing.

After two days of glazing work that I had made over the past few months I gave it a go. One thing about ceramics is you never quite know what is going to happen in the kiln. Once it’s loaded and you start firing all you can do is hope for the best. This time was not the best.

The planter pictured above is the same one that is in the middle of all the mugs in the picture of the loaded kiln. The clay body that I used to make the hanging planters apparently isn’t made to be fired to cone 5. When a clay body is over fired it starts to slump and melt. Unfortunately this planter slumped right onto half of my mugs. When glazes melt together there isn’t much you can do about it. My husband was able to clean up some of the mugs that were only messed up on the handles for us to keep and use personally, but they look a little rough. Some were just not salvageable.

I fired 4 hanging planters and they all melted and slumped. Just for the record I had fired this clay body in the previous glaze firing we had done when the kiln was at my sister in laws house. It made it through fine, but the kiln fired much differently over there and might not have quite hit the cone 5 temperature. I have learned my lesson.

Bubbled, melted and messed up hanging planter.
Hanging planter that melted to the kiln shelf. Good thing I had a nice layer of kiln wash on the shelf.

I was pretty bummed when we opened the kiln today. It’s always exciting to see what happened in the firing process, but you hope to see more good results than bad ones. That is the process though. The creative process doesn’t move in a straight line forward. It’s often a winding path and you might need to backtrack sometimes to move forward.

So, I pick myself up and move forward. What did I learn? Actually, I got a lot of information from this firing. Obviously I learned that the clay body I used for the hanging planters needs to be low fired. I also learned that with the new set up in our garage the kiln can easily hit temperature. I got good results from my glazes because of this. My mugs ended up being a nice big size in the end too  (clay shrinks as it drys so a piece will get smaller though out the firing process). I obtained good information to work with in the future and it wasn’t a total loss. I did end up with 6 mugs that turned out nice. That included one I was asked to make by a family member. I’m happy about that.

The mugs that turned out 🙂

I am currently working on some nice soup bowls and will be making more mugs soon as well. I’m still learning as I go. Thanks for the support <3